Free Base Ain’t Free

Free Base Ain’t Free

Some of you may remember the play “Free Base Ain’t Free” written by Oakland’s John Ivey.

The purpose of this play is to educate as well as entertain the communities, by using a series of vignettes showing life like examples of how the use of freebase cocaine negatively affected their lives, dramatizing it by intertwining dialogue and poetry through the use of a narrator who is seen by the audience but not by the actors.

John Arthur Ivey’s message depicted the psychological power it has on the subconscious mind, how it breaks down a person’s will power, changes his social standards, and finally takes away the user’s self-esteem.

The intention is to inform adults and to deter young children form ever starting. The solution expressed as only you can change a freebase fate take control of your life before it is too late, cause

“Free Base Ain’t Free”

Free Base March

There was an Anti-Drug protest march of East Bay youth throughout Oakland that culminated with a Special Presentation of the play featured in the Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) 24 April 1989, Mon· Page 9 

SIGNING “Can’t You Feel a New Day” about 100 youngsters from the drug-ridden Acorn housing project paraded about a mile yesterday through Oakland streets to attend an anti-drug play. The children, who walked to Beckett’s a nightclub in Jack London Square, were guests at a free performance of “Free Base Ain’t Free” a play with a strong message about the dangers of crack cocaine use. “It’s just like a field trip for them” said Darrell Hampton, a counselor at the Acorn Community Center. “I told the basketball team to get the dance group and the dance group to get the kids that hang out at the park,” Hampton said of the recruitment effort that quickly mushroomed as word spread about the performance. The children were treated to popcorn and soda. “They can mess up your life” said 10-year-old Kim Stephany of drugs. The performance was sponsored by KidsCorp, a nonprofit group assisted by Hayward Nissan/Chrysler Plymouth. 

I, Abdul-Jalil Co-Executive Produced it and performed a Starring DOU role of Characters in the play as:

1) OMEN: In his forties. Ex-Millionaire, out of shape and hair unkept.

2) Chuck: Professional baseball player-pitcher. Strong athletic build, in his mid-twenties.

It was a very challenging opportunity to portray an aging ex-millionaire in his 40’s at the same time being a young, rapping, strapping athletic 20 year old Baseball pitcher at the top of my game! I was able to do so because I am VERY close to those ORIGINAL characters the parts were developed from and know them in REAL LIFE!

PROGRAM

PROLOGUE

ACT II “GETTIN’ HIGH”

ACT III SCENE I – OUT AT THE CLUB

SCENE II – AT CHUCK’S PLACE

ACT IV “DON’T BE A CO-STAR IN YOUR OWN LIFE”

ACT V THE COMMUNITY COALITION

ACT VI THE MISCARRIAGE- NO VALUE FOR LOVE

EPILOGUE

The play featured DIRECTOR: Roy Andrews; and Cast members: HOMER: John Ivey; PORSHA: Adrea Adams; TAMURA: Cheri Collier; J-RAP: Mark Davis; MARCIA: Lolita Head; SPECIAL GUEST: Vince Ivey; UNDERSTUDIES: Suzanne Nichols, Kelly Christmas.

The play received critical acclaim and was the subject of many, many anti-drug promotions and ad campaigns when Oakland was being bombarded with government supplied crack cocaine!

One promotion of the play was sponsored by Oakland A’s All-Star pitcher Dave Steward, investment advisor Wornel Simpson, Abdul-Jalil and Superstar Management, KidsCorp, Mayor and City of Oakland, and Hayward Nissan/Chrysler Plymouth.

I am sincerely THANKFUL for ALL my BLESSINGS!

Abdul Jalil